The importance of appropriately range of data in a map

By Robert Simmon

Palettes aren’t the only important decision when visualizing data with color: you also need to consider scaling. Not only is the choice of start and end points (the lowest and highest values) critical, but the way intermediate values are stretched between them.

For most data simple linear scaling is appropriate. Each step in the data is represented by an equal step in the color palette. Choice is limited to the endpoints: the maximum and minimum values to be displayed. It’s important to include as much contrast as possible, while preventing high and low values from saturating (also called clipping). There should be detail in the entire range of data, like a properly exposed photograph.

 

Caption: These maps of sea surface temperature (averaged from July 2002 through January 2014) demonstrate the importance of appropriately choosing the range of data in a map. The top image varies from  -5˚ to 45˚ Celsius, a few degrees wider than the bounds of the data. Overall it lacks contrast, making it hard to see patterns. The lower image ranges from 0˚ to 28˚ Celsius, eliminating details in areas with very low or very high temperatures. (NASA/MODIS)